Mixed Files: Has Someone Else’s Name Showed Up On Your Credit Report?

Mixed files occur when someone else, often with a similar name or Social Security number, shows up on your credit report.

Sometimes, an honest consumer has an "evil twin" who suddenly pops up on their credit report. How can this happen? The computer doesn't look at every letter in your name and every number in your social security number, and it is an unfeeling inanimate object that couldn't care less about you.

For example, suppose your name is Jane Doe. Someone named Jane Dow has bad credit. You go to apply for a refinance on your house, and the bank turns you down because Jane Dow's 10 accounts in collection show up on your credit report. Lo and behold, Jane Dow has a similar Social Security number too. Suddenly, she's like that hard-luck old friend who won't leave your couch and eats all the food in your fridge. Or a scary movie about a bad roommate. What do you do?

Dispute it in writing via certified mail, save all credit denial letters and contact a consumer protection attorney!

Mixed Files Can Also Occur Between Parents, Children And Siblings

Suppose your name is John Doe Jr. Your dad is John Doe Sr. Your dad was never very good with money, and well...you go to apply for a car loan, and you are turned down for credit, because your dad's court judgment from nine years ago is on your credit report. Oh, and your little brother, Jeff Doe, has a couple of drug convictions and you fail a background check when you are applying for a new job.

Then, you are turned down for an apartment, apparently because Jeff was thrown out of his last place, so you take your chances on Craigslist. You thought you were rid of your crazy family when you got your MBA and moved to the city, but unfortunately, not on your credit report. What do you do?

Dispute it in writing via certified mail, save all credit denial letters and call a consumer protection attorney!

Does Your Credit Report Still List An Account As Adverse (Delinquent Or In Default) When You've Already Paid It Or Had It Discharged?

Paid, settled and discharged debts are often incorrectly reported on consumers' credit reports. Suppose you had a debt that you paid off in a Chapter 13 plan, which you successfully completed and were awarded a discharge at the end. Not only is this debt paid, it is discharged. But several years later, it comes back to haunt you when you apply for credit. Then, it looks like you had a bankruptcy and "new" negative items in default. The creditors you already paid start coming after you for the bills. What do you do?

Dispute it in writing via certified mail, save all credit denial letters and call a consumer protection attorney! There are special strategies for dealing with debts that were discharged in bankruptcy but are now coming back to haunt you. Call 888-339-3942 to learn more.

Credit Reports Say You Are Deceased — But Last You Checked, You Do Have A Pulse!

Sometimes, the credit bureaus can really mess up and report that you are deceased. As Mark Twain said, "the reports of my death are greatly exaggerated." Or to quote Monty Python, "I'm not dead! I don't want to go on the cart!" What do you do?

Dispute it in writing via certified mail, save all credit denial letters and call a consumer protection attorney!

Call A Consumer Protection Lawyer: 888-339-3942

If you are in or around Seattle and your credit report doesn't reflect reality, call 888-339-3942 or send me an email.

I am a member of NACA, the National Association of Consumer Advocates.